DART PCD Blades – Tough & Long Lasting!

Why PCD?

PCD is a polycrystalline diamond, manufactured by sintering together carefully selected diamond particles at a very high temperature and pressure in the presence of a solvent/catalyst metal. The result is an extremely tough inter grown mass of randomly orientated diamond crystals bonded to a tungsten carbide substrate. PCD, therefore can be regarded as a composite material which combines the hardness, abrasion resistance and high thermal conductivity of diamond with the toughness of tungsten carbide.

Polycrystalline is ultimately an extremely hard material – harder than tungsten and carbide, so will outperform a TCT blade by up to 50 times life wise.

Another advantage of the DART PCD blade is that it creates very little dust unlike the abrasive discs often used, as it produces a shaving rather than a powdery dust, even in cement board.

 

When is PCD used?

Correctly applied, PCD tooling replaces existing tool materials such as HSS or tungsten carbide. With the rise in use of wood substitutes (such as wood composites and plastic woods) for future house building in the construction industry – the traditional TCT Blade struggles to cut many of these new materials – leaving an untidy, unattractive cut and the need to replace the blade frequently. This is where the PCD Blade can be seen as a must in any building or timber merchants, as it offers the user an effortless, clean cut in a huge variety of ultra-hard materials. Just to name a few - it will cut through cement fibre board products, such as Marley Eternit, HardiePlank, ‘No More Ply’,  MDF and Corian, as well as laminated and melamine surfaces, GRP, softwoods and hardwoods, plywood and chipboard.

How do they compare cost-wise?

The cost of a PCD Blade can be up to 10 times more expensive than a TCT Blade – but there are extra considerations to take into account. When cutting through certain materials, the user often needs to change a carbide blade daily, while the polycrystalline can last up to 50 times longer – so there is little doubt that the initial cost factor is far outweighed by the extended tool life. In addition, this doesn’t take into consideration the cost of having machine downtime and the time-savings associated with using a PCD blade.

DART Tool Group is a trusted and reliable supplier of PCD blades. With a range of sizes starting at 160 mm and going up to 300mm, with 4 to 8 teeth and an extra-large gullet design, which minimises dust and improves removal of material – you can be guaranteed a smoother, cleaner and more accurate cutting– if you haven’t considered PCD yet, then now is the time!

DART…The Serious Alternative.

Visit https://www.darttoolgroup.com/circular-saw-blades/diamond-pcd-blades for more information.

Peter Brett’s view

I tried the DART PCD 250mm diameter saw blade on12mm thick cement board. The resulting cuts were very accurate and clean – almost planed clean, making the job of joining them accurately easier. My experience of it is that it cuts the board like a knife through butter with very little effort or noise.

The blade sent for the test had just six teeth, spaced about 130mm apart on the periphery of the blade. Each of the teeth has a peppering of PCD particles on it that you can see through a magnifier but not really with the naked eye. There is a large depth-limiting chunk of blade directly in front of each tooth followed by a series of three smaller rounded bumps that serve to clear out the dust as quickly as possible. In comparison to a normal TCT blade, the dust and swarf is incredibly little – due to the lower number of teeth.

There are also six noise reducing slots cut into the blade that dispel heat and therefore reduce or eliminate heat distortion. The blade is a mere 2mm thick and does not cut a thick kerf – reducing drag and friction. I guess some of the smaller diameter blades in this same DART series would be usable in cordless saws as a result. 

Diaquip 350mm Electric Disc Cutter

 

Why Buy?

  • Robustly made
  • Big capacity
  • Dust extraction ski
  • Water dust suppression built in
  • Wheel set for accurate cutting

 

The Diaquip machine is instantly recognisable as professionally rated – just looking at it you realise that it is solidly built, straightforward and no-nonsense. The U-shaped side handle, for instance, is a solid steel-plated tube, bolted into place and covered with an insulating and grippy ribbed-rubber compound. This handle is strong and rigid and shaped so that the user can grip from the top as well as the side when the cutter is used in different orientations.

An elongated main handle is placed directly behind the blade, and it gives users a good view of the cut, as well as allowing them to have enough leverage on the blade to be able to guide it accurately.

All the adjustments that should be on a machine like this are there - they are simple to operate and are strongly made. There is also a simple arbor lock for easy blade changing.

The big and strong cast alloy blade guard incorporates two methods of dust suppression. The most obvious of these is the water-based version, since it involves a tube for the water feed attached to the heavy-duty main power cable that leads down to front of the guard. For ease of use there is a water feed valve at the entrance of the water tube, and a standard hose lock water coupling is provided for instant snap on/off hose connection.

Right at the bottom of the guard is a standard sized dust port that will connect to a vacuum dust extractor should the user choose. It is also good to note that the dust port has a little cover on it so that when vac extraction is not being used, the sludge doesn’t come straight back at the operator.

Or if you prefer you can use the dust ski. Held in place by a simple pin this fits underneath the blade so that the weight of the machine rests on the stainless steel base of the ski. With the support this gives, again accuracy of cut is improved, but more to the point, the ski provides a shroud to the blade that concentrates dangerous dusts right to the back of the ski where it is collected much more efficiently by the (correct) class of vacuum extractor. Since the ski adds so much to the overall dust safety of the cutter it is indeed a very useful addition to the whole saw kit, eradicating all dust when cutting. 

Having used them on a few cuts when I was slicing through some delicate 40mm thick marble, I am a great fan of the guide rollers assembly that comes with this machine. They are simply fitted using a butterfly bolt right under the balance point of the main motor housing. They allow the user to rest the weight of the machine onto a hard surface and use this extra stability to guide the cutter for greater accuracy.

Although it is only a simple addition, the splash guard that can be fitted at the back end of the blade guard is another nice touch. Simple to fit, it also provides some protection for the user from water and sludge splash.

The machine boasts obvious power and cutting ability in a variety of materials, such as reinforced concrete and paving materials.

Back home in my workspace, I found it was a Very Useful and Capable Machine. It is clearly quieter using an electric motor, but didn’t seem less powerful or less capable. I found myself using the water dust suppression system nearly all the time, because it works very well and is simple to attach and set up from either a garden hose or a pressurised container. Accurate cuts are easy to achieve as you become more expert in the use of the machine – much helped by the judicious use of the guide rollers of course.

It would definitely be a machine I would look at if I were a construction worker – powerful, easy to use with good dust suppression – lots to like.

 

Diaquip 350mm Electric Disc Cutter - The Competition Gets Tougher

Petrol vs Electric Power

While it is great to have the independence of a petrol-powered disc cutter in some places, there is no doubt that the use of electrically powered machines has grown because they are quieter and just as efficient. Noise is definitely an issue when these petrol cutters are being used in public places and it may be a limiting factor when used near hospitals and schools for example. I also find them easier to work with too – but that is probably a personal experience – noise can add to the ‘scariness factor’ sometimes.

The other technical challenge that has been overcome is the use of water-based dust suppression on electric machines. We have always been warned that electricity and water don’t mix, but apparently with a bit of care and the right parameters, they can safely be kept apart.

All new disc cutters have to have ways of suppressing dust because of current health and safety legislation, and probably not before time, because they are often used on hard building materials like concrete. Cutting concrete produces a lot of the very fine silica dust that is one of the worst dusts for our lungs.

 

Diaquip’s Concrete Saw

The Diaquip machine is instantly recognisable as professionally rated – just looking at it you realise that it is solidly built, straightforward and no-nonsense. The U-shaped side handle, for instance, is a solid steel-plated tube, bolted into place and covered with an insulating and grippy ribbed-rubber compound. This handle is strong and rigid and shaped so that the user can grip from the top as well as the side when the cutter is used in different orientations.

An elongated main handle is placed directly behind the blade, and it gives users a good view of the cut, as well as allowing them to have enough leverage on the blade to be able to guide it accurately. The oval-shaped aperture of the handle also allows users some movement options for the trigger hand. The trigger is big enough for easy use by gloved hands, and it comes with a lockout button, of course.  Right on the top of the trigger handle is the load-warning lamp so that it is very easy to see if an overload occurs.

Easy to Set up?

All the adjustments that should be on a machine like this are there - they are simple to operate and are strongly made. For example, the lever that locks the blade guard into various positions is a simple L-shaped steel piece that locks into a series of holes on the guard. It doesn’t need any more complication, but it does need to work easily when the machine is covered in sludge after a hard day on site.

There is also a simple arbor lock for easy blade changing.

 

Other Options

The big and strong cast alloy blade guard incorporates two methods of dust suppression. The most obvious of these is the water-based version, since it involves a tube for the water feed attached to the heavy-duty main power cable that leads down to front of the guard. There are two nozzles – one on each side of the blade - that spray water onto it. With the right amount of water at the right pressure, there should be precious little dust escaping into the environment. For ease of use there is a water feed valve at the entrance of the water tube, and a standard hose lock water coupling is provided for instant snap on/off hose connection.

Right at the bottom of the guard is a standard sized dust port that will connect to a vacuum dust extractor should the user choose. The amount of dust produced at full speed is quite considerable, so a small L-Class vac is probably not going to do a good enough of job of protecting the user, and those nearby, from the inevitable dust that does escape. A really powerful H-Class extractor will do a much better job – but users will still need appropriately rated facemasks and other PPE. It is also good to note that the dust port has a little cover on it so that when vac extraction is not being used, the sludge doesn’t come straight back at the operator.

Or if you prefer you can use the dust ski. Held in place by a simple pin this fits underneath the blade so that the weight of the machine rests on the stainless steel base of the ski. With the support this gives, again accuracy of cut is improved, but more to the point, the ski provides a shroud to the blade that concentrates dangerous dusts right to the back of the ski where it is collected much more efficiently by the (correct) class of vacuum extractor. Since the ski adds so much to the overall dust safety of the cutter it is indeed a very useful addition to the whole saw kit, eradicating all dust when cutting.  Regs still say that good PPE (masks, goggles, gloves, hearing protection) is needed in the battle against dust intake that leads to silicosis – so be wise and comply.

 

Other Bits I Liked

Having used them on a few cuts when I was slicing through some delicate 40mm thick marble, I am a great fan of the guide rollers assembly that comes with this machine. They are simply fitted using a butterfly bolt right under the balance point of the main motor housing. They allow the user to rest the weight of the machine onto a hard surface and use this extra stability to guide the cutter for greater accuracy.

Although it is only a simple addition, the splash guard that can be fitted at the back end of the blade guard is another nice touch. Simple to fit, it also provides some protection for the user from water and sludge splash.

Plantworx

I first saw the Diaquip being put through its paces at a rain soaked and windswept Plantworx Show. I thought at the time that these conditions might be a more typical usage framework than some of the sunnier weather we have had recently. During the demonstration, I was impressed by its obvious power and cutting ability in a variety of materials such as reinforced concrete and paving materials. Water dust suppression was being used, just to add to the already damp atmosphere, and it clearly worked well.

Back home in my workspace, the weather was drier but I still ended up thinking that this was a Very Useful and Capable Machine. It is clearly quieter using an electric motor, but didn’t seem less powerful or less capable. I found myself using the water dust suppression system nearly all the time, because it works very well and is simple to attach and set up from either a garden hose or a pressurised container. Accurate cuts are easy to achieve as you become more expert in the use of the machine – much helped by the judicious use of the guide rollers of course.

It would definitely be a machine I would look at if I were a construction worker – powerful, easy to use with good dust suppression – lots to like.

 

Aimed at: Construction workers, heavy-duty users

Pros: Powerful, easy to use and excellent dust suppression 

Two Diamond Cutting Discs from Klingspor Making the Cut

Aimed at: depending on the grade all the way up to demanding professionals

Pros: Made in Europe OSA approved for safety and ingenious design makes for good cutting performance.

To speak to some tradespeople it would seem that the most important thing about a diamond cutting disc is the price. Not the materials it was designed for cutting, not safety, not speed of cut nor the amount of noise it made. Now I am definitely keen on getting value for money, but I am also keenly aware of my safety and my time.

However, I do get a sense of satisfaction when I get a tradesperson come up and ask about a particular piece of kit and I am able to make the point that good kit, used well, can be safer and quicker, thus saving time and money, as well as making for happier clients.

Of course there is the sharp intake of breath when I tell them, for example, that my rail saw cost £500, but the message remains that sometimes, its not all about the price you pay – sometimes the bottom line needs a bit more sophistication when being calculated. It can be a case of penny wise but pound foolish.  

Diamond cutting discs are squarely in the area of you “get what you pay for”. There are literally dozens of makes of cheap diamond discs on the market. They all vary enough in appearance and packaging for you to be vaguely able to tell the difference so that you can find them again. But my argument is that a good quality diamond disc, chosen with the job in mind, is more likely to perform well, save you time and minimise wear and tear on your disc cutting machine.

Enter the two diamond discs sent by major abrasives company, Klingspor. Established in Germany in 1893 by Johan Friedrich Klingspor to make a variety of abrasives, the company was behind the development of abrasive cut-off wheels and grinding discs in the 1950s and 60s. With manufacturing facilities in Europe, the US and Mexico, the company is one of the four largest abrasives companies in the world and produces a huge range of abrasives of many types – hence it has a lot riding on getting its products right both in terms of price and performance.

Klingspor makes a point of providing discs at three price points (good, better, best) to meet the needs of customers’ varying needs and its in-house R and D facility in Germany offers continuous review, development and improvement of its products. ALL of Klingspor’s diamond discs are Organisation for the Safety of Abrasives (oSa) accredited – the highest level of safety accreditation available.

I was sent two mid-range discs for review, a DT600U and a DT612AB. The DT600U is so designated because it is a mid-priced universal blade meant to be used on pretty well all construction materials from natural stone, to reinforced concrete and all stations in between. This blade has proved to be very successful in the market – not only because of its pricing but also because of its design – a design that makes for rapid cutting as well as a long disc life. Now normally, these two features would work against each other. Long disc life usually means having a slightly thicker blade and deeper segmentation of the blade. On the other hand, a thinner blade usually means a quicker cut because there is not so much dust to remove from the thinner kerf, but the thinner blade then wears more quickly. You can also make a blade last longer by making deeper segments, but that brings other issues into play like the safety of the weld of the segments onto the disc.

What Klingspor has managed to do with this blade is to strike the correct compromise between thickness and wear and the secret of this is in the design of the segments. This 300mm diameter disc has 32 segments squeezed onto its rim. Each individual segment is 10mm deep and it has 25mm deep gullets that are wider at the bottom, that slim down a bit before ending in a precisely drilled hole for reducing noise. The wider slot at the bottom allows dust to be shifted quickly from the cut. A look through a magnifier reveals a fairly close, but random, distribution of diamonds on the segments, but if you think that more diamonds always equals faster cutting, then you are wrong. You may not get optimum cutting if too many diamonds produce too much dust to shift from the cut and then cause clogging.  But the key design feature is the number of segments on the rim – 32 segments with regular slots to disperse the waste quickly has proved to make a blade that not only cuts quickly, but lasts well too. By the end of my tests on steel, concrete, marble and bricks, I could barely see any sign of wear on the rim at all, promising a longer life – I still expect to be using this blade in a few month’s time.

The DT612AB disc is a more specialised design for use largely on concrete and asphalt and has been a hit with utilities, road repair contractors and general construction firms.

The one thing that is very obvious when looking at the segments of this blade is that the diamond distribution is much closer than the DT600U. The diamonds are also coated in titanium powder for maximum adhesion as asphalt and concrete are very aggressive and tend to tear away diamonds that are not tightly bonded. With eighteen larger segments and much larger open–ended gullets cut into the rim, it is clear that dust removal is one of the main aims of this design. Nothing for it but to mount it on the machine and try it out on some concrete and asphalt. Fortunately, I have a small asphalted area where I park my car, and I was struck by just how “clingy” asphalt can be when cutting, as the heat melts the tar and sort of gums it up. But the big gullets do their job and cutting is quite quick – if you are not careful you can go too deep quite quickly. Concrete is a doddle with this disc, no wonder road repair firms are buying it – it is perfect for cutting kerbstones.  I know I had a relatively short time of testing, but the wear on the disc at the end was very small, meaning that I can use the disc on other jobs….

In the end, quality always wins out for me – I have proved to myself again and again that you get what you pay for. These Klingspor diamond discs, tick lots of boxes and I will certainly keep an eye out for them when I have worn these ones out.   

 

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