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Morris Site Machinery at EHS 2017

Morris Site Machinery throws light on innovation for hire industry

Morris Site Machinery will spotlight the latest innovations in power, lighting and welding at the 2017 Executive Hire Show to help hirers grow their business and harness the full potential of their machines.

The leading light-and-power supplier is bringing more solutions and technology-focused products and will unveil its next generation lighting tower range, including the TL90 Ultimate at the event. This new addition has up-to-the minute engine technology from Perkins and Kubota offering longer run times and is fitted with a Deep Sea control panel with telemetry options to give operators advanced monitoring, more traceability and security. The four 300W LED lights provide fuel efficient and crisp, clear, instant light. 

The show will also launch the company’s limited edition range of Cobra inverter welders. The ArcGen Cobra 500i has real bite; a multi-process inverter welder that is a lightweight but powerful welding power source. The Cobra processes include MMA, TIG, Arc Gouging and MIG with the addition of compatible add-on units. 500amps of DC welding power makes it ideal for heavy fabrication, ship yard, oil and gas, quarry and manufacturing industries.

In the dedicated Innovation Zone the chance to trial the Makinex Hose 2 Go from the Morris Select Range is expected to be a popular draw. A special water challenge will offer a fun experience for visitors and the chance to win prizes. The Makinex Hose 2 Go is ideal as a dust suppression tool and portable water supply. It provides a constant and accurate flow of water to suppress dust when cutting, core drilling and grinding concrete. The innovative equipment enables water to flow without a pump, battery or electronics. Lightweight and portable, its 13.8 litre capacity provides up to 30 minutes of constant flowing water, with no need to manually pump to get the required water pressure.  

Morris Site Machinery’s latest range of Inmesol Rental generators will be on show for the first time. Robust, compact and technically innovative, these 24-hour run generators build on the breadth of offer now available from the company and will offer greater choice to the UK hire industry. They feature a Deep Sea control panel with telemetry options available to allow users to remotely control the machines and review their fuel management. The protective paint coating provides high resistance to ultraviolet radiation and prevents rust and corrosion. A user-friendly ‘plug and go’ socket panel includes all the common size sockets for 400/230v and all Inmesol generators come with Stage IIIA compliant engines which can be synchronised with an intelligent control module allowing full load-sharing for up to 32 gensets.

Richard Denholm, Sales Director at Morris Site Machinery, said: “This show is a great opportunity for us to engage with customers and spotlight innovative and efficient products to help them grow their business. We have extended our range of innovative products and price points, while maintaining the great quality and service we are renowned for, to meet the industry needs.

“Our Customer Service Showcase Team will be on hand to promote our new range and to talk about service packages. Our client relationships are important to us and we look forward to meeting our valued, existing customers and gaining new ones.”

The stand will also feature its market-leading Denyo Eventa 20Kva and, for the first time, the new SMC 3kva Generator and SMC 200 amp petrol welder.

Morris Site Machinery will be on Stand B50 at The Executive Hire Show on 8 and 9 February at Ricoh Arena, Coventry.

 

GYSMi 80P Welder - As Compact as You Dare?

Aimed at: General users who occasionally Weld.

Pros: A portable and capable little welder that can be brought anywhere. 

Remember when welders were so bulky you had to use them in a workshop or not at all? Sometimes they even had wheels to help you out a tiny bit. It wasn’t that long ago. But, in what seems like an almost single-handed quest to help welding reach the masses, the GYS Company in France has been using modern electronics to reduce the size and increase the capability and controllability of welders to the point where I have been reviewing and using a tiny welder that would literally fit into a child’s shoebox.

 

Measuring just 215mm long, 99mm wide and 143mm high and weighing in at around 2.5Kgs the GYSMi 80P has enough capability in its tiny casing to weld ferrous metals up to 5mm thick using welding rods from 1.6 to 2.5mm. With the right rods, steel, stainless steel and and cast iron can be welded. With its perfect portability it makes sense that this is a “go anywhere” welder for small tasks such as mending farm gates and steel frame buildings, so it is also great to know that it can be used in conjunction with a portable generator as low as 3kW capacity.

The GYSMi 80P is the smallest of a small series of welders that increase in size and capability in steps up to a very capable 200 amps and 5mm welding rods, so users can choose the machine to suit the tasks envisaged. They all have some very advanced technology built in, clearly the bigger they are, the more the technology that can be included.

However, the GYSMi 80P is no slouch. Electronic technologies have a great part to play in welding because they can be used to monitor the human input as well as the heat, current etc taking place at the welding point. Using all this data, the welder can optimise the weld so that even inexperienced welders can end up with an acceptable result. And with overheating etc overrides built in the user has the reassurance that he will not damage the machine by using it inexpertly.

This outcome is something that our Continental friends have been able to access for many years because welding is very much part of their DIY and light trade culture. I can only guess that in the past in the UK we have either been too scared of welding as it is seen as “dangerous” or “too specialised” or even too expensive to invest in for occasional use.

To give some examples of how the GYSMi 80P helps make better welders of its users, the electronics helps with some of the following: - The so called Hot Start increases the current at the start of the weld so that the user can get the weld going. This avoids the stop/start of the welding rod that many new to welding experience that usually results in a series of blobs on the welding line. In my short experience of using the machine the Hot Start feature was the feature that helped me get a weld going smoothly so that I could judge the feed rate of the welding rod.

The next feature is Arc Force – this increases the current when the electrode enters into melted metal created by the weld and then tends to stick. Again, this allows the user to remove the electrode and move on as smoothly as possible into the weld.

The Anti Sticking feature is the one that also helped me in my experience of welding. I tend to get a lot of “sticks” because I don’t feed the electrode smoothly and evenly enough to get that desired “ribbed” look of a successful weld.

Since becoming known as having a welder in my workshop I have had a number of requests to weld a few things. One of these was a set of weighted volleyball net holders whose legs had broken off from being bent over too far. In the end, it was a simple matter of realigning and then reattaching the legs by a couple of straight (ish?) welds. They are still in daily use weeks later, so my weld must have been good enough.

Other uses have been a couple of short welds for a friend who fancies himself as a sculptor. He is already talking about borrowing my GYSMi, but with a price of around the £100 for a ready to go kit, I am sure he could afford his own.

From the dealer point of view, welders like the GYSMi 80P are now not really any more specialised than some woodworking machines or power tools that they might stock. There could be many advantages in taking on a new line. Some dealers I have spoken to in rural areas have seen increases in business by stocking welding gear.

Like many other products, the welding machines are very competitively priced, but welding accessories are an absolute requirement for continued use, and these can help dealers develop healthy sales in electrodes, gloves, masks and other small tools.

It only takes one member of a sales force to have a bit of training and experience in welding for him/her to become a bit of an expert. At its HQ in Rugby, GYS UK is able to give the necessary training and product knowledge required to successfully stock and sell welders.

There is lots to like about the GYSMi 80P – not least of which is the fact that it is ready to go – all you really need to add are some suitable electrodes and basic safety kit like mask and gloves etc. And I have to say there is something very satisfying about being able to make a simple and quick, and hopefully long lasting repair, to something using a suitable weld. I have done the vain attempts to bind a pair of metal pieces together with wire, only to see the repair fail as the whole thing moves or falls apart because the strength of the repair is simply not good enough. And with a machine that helps you to be a better welder via its electronics – I will take that any day. 

Welsh Welders Win Hat-Trick

  • Coleg Cambria, from North Wales have been crowned winners of the Weld Off 2016 for the third time
  • Hosted by Morris Site Machinery and partners Speedy Services the welders aged between 16-26 years took part in a live welding competition which was themed on ‘God Save the Queen’, to celebrate the Queen’s 90th birthday

Students from Coleg Cambria have been crowned the best young welders in Britain for the third time at the sensational final of the national live welding competition, Weld Off 2016.

Four Coleg Cambria students from the North East Wales college took the top spot and prizes worth more than £3,000. Matthew Hughes, Gareth Phillips, Owen Fitzgibbon and Thomas Lavender wowed judges with their breath-taking replica of the Queen’s Royal Carriage, complete with gilded crown, ornate royal detailing and even a piece of red carpet inside which the Queen herself has stepped on.  

Morris Site Machinery, supplier of ArcGen Welding equipment and in association with Speedy, hosted the competition which required four finalist teams of students between the ages of 16- 26 years old from across the UK, to showcase their welding prowess. The competition comprised a Q&A round, a skills section and a creative test which challenged contestants to create an inspiring exhibition piece based on the theme of ‘God Save the Queen’.

The live competition hosted at Speedy’s National Distribution Centre in Tamworth, now in its third year, attracted some of the most talented welding students and apprentices from across the nation.

National business broadcaster, Steph McGovern, winner of ‘Young Engineer for Britain’ at just 19 years old, attended the competition as special guest, assisted the judges and provided moral support for all the contestants throughout the day.  

The national judging panel was made-up of welding specialists from across the industry including  Michael Scarrott from awarding association for industry qualifications, EAL, who was head judge; Richard Denholm, Sales Director and Welding Specialist from Morris Site Machinery, along with Mick Link from Speedy.

Phil Winnington, Managing Director at Morris Site Machinery, said: “This has been an outstanding year for the Weld-Off and it was a truly competitive atmosphere! Every year the bar is raised and we have been astounded by the level of creativity, quality and interpretation of the theme which celebrates Her Majesty at 90.

“British manufacturing is seeing a renaissance and we wanted a theme which would compliment this.  Our competition attracts and uncovers a wealth of talent and skills we have in the UK. This is something we wanted to champion and encourage more young people into engineering to ensure that Britain’s skills base and manufacturing heritage are retained as best as possible.

“Coleg Cambria continue to set the standard every year and we would like to congratulate them on their performance and achieving a hat-trick. We would also like to thank all the teams who entered and especially those who competed to make this year’s competition the best yet.”

The highly commended runners-up included apprentices from City of Wolverhampton College, who created a robust interpretation of London’s famous Tower Bridge; students from Training 2000 in Lancashire, who also took cues from the Royal Family and welded a Royal Carriage and the team from New College Durham who produced an afternoon tea setting complete with French Fancie cakes fit for the Queen and any garden party.

Jane Nugent, Marketing Director of Speedy Services, the UK’s leading tools, equipment and plant hire services company, said: “We were delighted to host the competition at our National Distribution Centre. Everyone was very impressed with the calibre and creativity of work.  The contestants’ work ethic, skill and passion really shone through and all 16 are a real credit to young people in the manufacturing and engineering sectors.

Welding Has Changed – And I Get my Hands Dirty Proving the Point

In Europe, “ordinary” DIYers and small trades think nothing of reaching for a welder when they need one. But in the UK we shy away from welding. But GYS are about to change that. 

Working with wood is my key skill, but I have done some fairly regular “maintenance and repair” welding. My visit to GYS UK in Rugby was a chance to experience the best of modern electronically controlled welding to see if I could improve my welding skills. My tutor in this experiment was the charming and knowledgeable Amaury from France who informed me that he could make a difference to my welding skills in about twenty or thirty minutes. It is a tribute to his patience and skill that I managed a run of competent looking welds in about twenty minutes and I came away more confident knowing what I could do in future to make stronger and neater welds.

I started with the GYSmi 80P – the cheapest and smallest of the GYS MMA Inverter range of welders. I think this was just to prove that being the smallest in the range doesn’t mean that it is inferior. Amaury showed me how to set the dial on the 80P to suit the size of the electrode – there is only one control so this is simplicity itself. Making the necessary connections and setting up the cables is easy too – they are all provided in the box. The only extras needed are electrodes and PPE before I was ready to go. Amaury suggested that I test the welder’s ability to avoid the electrode “sticking” at the start of the weld and after a few attempts I was able to start smoothly because instead of having to pull the electrode sharply away when it stuck, the welder’s electronics simply cut the power and made the “stick” easy to release.

Amaury’s demo weld showed a curved herring bone pattern that I did my best to emulate, and after ten minutes, when I had got used to the fairly rapid feed rate needed on the electrode, I managed a slightly wobbly weld that met his approval. Apparently all I need to work on is my coordination between the hand and electrode to ensure that the weld remains even and strong.

The second welder I tried was the GYS SMARTMIG 162 aimed at the professional or semi-professional user. I have never done MIG welding before but I had seen it on the telly and it looks like fun – a good reason, in my view, to give it a go.

Again, Amaury explained the very simple set up of the machine using the SMART control panel to set wire speed and power, all I had to do was select what I knew about what I wanted to weld, the wire diameter and thickness of the metal. This set up gives workable parameters, but experienced welders will know when to adjust the dial a fraction here and there because local conditions like ambient temperature can make a difference.

Amaury also explained to me that the hand position in MIG welding was different to MMA because the feed is forward and the left hand needs to support the torch to get a smooth movement and therefore a smooth, neat weld. I must admit that it took at least six attempts before I got a weld that I actually liked and that matched the demo weld somewhat, but I think that MIG welding could be for me – it feels smoother and slightly easier for me to do. According to Amaury, from now on, it is just practice that will develop my welding skills. I am willing to believe him, but the point is that in a short time I learned a lot more about MIG welding than I thought I could.

For more information on GYS Welding, please visit www.gys.fr

The Weld Off – British Style Phil Winnington Throws down The Welding Gauntlet

Phil Winnington, Managing Director of Morris Site Machinery, has a mission – to make The Weld Off 2016 bigger, and better than ever before. He took some time out of a busy schedule at the Executive Hire Show to talk to ToolBUSINESS+HIRE to tell us more about the competition.

The Weld Off is now in its third year, and its profile, along with that of UK Welding continues to grow. This year Morris Site Machinery, Speedy Services, EAL and KEMPPI will sponsor the competition aimed at young welders throughout the country.  Phil believes that this is the type of competition that will inspire the next generation of welders, a profession that has slowed down in recent times. As Phil says ‘You want real life things to aim for within colleges, so to get young welders involved in something which was targeted, has enabled us to introduce ourselves to the industry at grassroots level.’

After the initial comprehensive assessment of largely college-based applicants, the judges choose the four teams to compete in the final at the Speedy Services base in Tamworth on May 11th 2016. Like the Great British Bake Off, knowledge, skills and creativity are tested in full on the day of the final via a rigorous process. It begins with a questionnaire establishing the teams’ knowledge of welding practices and design, amongst other skills, as well as the all important Health and Safety regulations. Two members of the team are then chosen to compete in an extended skills test during which they have to demonstrate full familiarity with a variety of welding techniques.  Finally, the whole team has to cooperate to design and make a big piece – this year’s theme is “God Save the Queen” to celebrate the Queen’s 90th Birthday. Also, the Sex Pistols made the charts with their version of the national anthem 40 years ago, so this could add a different slant to the theme. The chance of potentially witnessing Punk Welding is a notion I find very intriguing!

The previous two competitions have given a real indication of potential diversity and progress being made by young people within the sector.  Phil spoke highly of the collaborative nature of the competition, ”If you are putting a team together for a design piece, so you may need one or two be the lead creative, and then two more with strong hands on skills. It is important to have all four working alongside each other as a cohesive team.” The first year’s winners also included a young woman, which is a real step for the future of welding and engineering in general.

Phil went on to explain that Morris Site Machinery would like to expand the scope of the Weld Off in the future. This would ideally involve regional finals so that more students would have the opportunity to enter the competition and be more  “hands-on”, with the strongest candidates heading for the finals.

From Phil’s words and indeed all those involved with the Weld Off, it is clear they are keen to raise the profile of welding as a key skill in the British industrial landscape. The competition will help further this aim; introducing a skill that could provide both young and older men and women with an exciting career that has good prospects for the future.

ToolBUSINESS+HIRE will be in Tamworth at the finals of the 2016 finals, which take place on May 11th, so watch out for full coverage of the event in the June Issue. After speaking to Phil, I for one am very much looking forward to checking it out.

If you would be interested in getting involved with the Weld Off 2016, or future events, please contact the Morris Marketing Department on 01743 234 224 or email [email protected]

IMPAX launch TIG welder & PLASMA cutter

IMPAX professional power tools launch its 2016 range offer with new welding machines, consumables and PPE!

The IMPAX range of professional machines covers the three core workshop categories of Welding, Compressors and Generators. The welding offer now covers for the first time TIG welding and Plasma Cutting plus all the associated consumables. “Affordable performance is a must for our users and the new machines really deliver” explains Ben Warcup, UK General manager of NAP brands (the exclusive UK distributor). “Our users ratings online speak for themselves and we are always on the look-out for new dealers”.

Welding has always been a core category for the IMPAX brand and the new machines take the range to 5 dedicated units complete with consumables and spares. Available from Screwfix, TradePoint and dedicated dealers the IMPAX offer gives great value and outstanding performance.

NAP Brands are also the exclusive distributor of STANLEY® welding machines, welding PPE and consumables. The huge offer is aimed at the discerning user and all the machines are based around electronic inverter technology that leads the market in power consumption and delivery.

NAP brands supply the retail and wholesale industry with branded hand tools, generators, welders and compressors exclusively distributing selected categories from STANLEY® BLACK & DECKER® and IMPAX®. Contact [email protected] / 01926 482880. www.napbrands.co.uk. Follow us on Twitter @napbrands.

Welability - SIF

Bringing together a better future for UK manufacturing.

Weldability LogoOn Friday the 27th March after a short train ride from London Kings Cross and brisk walk through Letchworth town centre, we arrived at Weldability-Sif for the official opening of their Technology and Training Centre.

In recent times welding, along with the UK Manufacturing Industry as a whole, has slowed, almost to the point of vanishing. Although this is largely down to outsourcing to overseas manufacturers, there is also a perception that it is a profession for older generations, one that the young do not see as a plausible or accessible career pathway. However, Weldabity-SIF are doing all they can to change that.

SIF tipsAdrian Hawkins, Chairman of Weldability-SIF began the day by looking back on how the company has evolved during their 90-year history. He told the story of how during the Second World War, SIF-Tips, the company’s publication offering welding tips and ideas, changed its mascot from ‘Willie the Welder’, to ‘Winnie the Welder’ to help women adapt to their new found status as blue collar workers. Even during wartime, Sifbronze, as it was then known, were creating inroads to making welding accessible to all, regardless of age or gender.

The company has gone from strength to strength over the past decade, becoming Weldability SIF in 2007. With the new Weldability-SIF Technology and Training Centre, of which the offices of Unit 1 will be named ‘Peter’s House’, after Adrian’s late Father, this day was as much about looking forward as back. Due to the work of the Weldability-SIF foundation, apprenticeships in the sector are becoming far more accessible with training welding workshops opening in engineering colleges around the country. These welding workshop include the recently opened Llaneli based Coleg Sir Gar, and also the one at Goole College, based in Hull.

Weldability Building OpeningSir Oliver Heald, the MP of the Letchworth Area officially opened the new building, before being taken on a tour round the new Technology and Training Centre. After a quick look at the new Showroom, we were then taken through at demonstration of how a Weldability-SIF Apprenticeship works. Initially an Apprentice will focus on the theoretical side of the vocation, using the facilities of the E Learning suite to be taken through the training and then take online tests to prepare for the practical side of the job. He or she will then begin honing their Welding skills in the Vitual Welding studio, enabling them to practice without being at risk of injury or worse and also saving wastage of materials at such an early stage. Furthermore this E learning is portable, and is currently making its way around schools in the Greater London Area.

We were a given the opportunity to chance our arm with the virtUweld welding simulator, and it is safe to say I’d need a fair few more lessons before I don the mask and have a crack at the real thing!

Another fascinating part of the tour was looking at the work of Extractability, the fume extraction division of Welability-SIF. New regulations, tightening up on the management of fumes has lead to improvements in Extractability products, with the Protecto line, having an extensive range of Extraction arms, fans, downdraft benches, hoses, filters, vacuum systems and filters, both fixed and mobile. Its great to see the company doing what it can to not only make the vocation accessible, but also developing their technology to make the future bright, with more green credentials.

After the tour was over, we were treated to an excellent lunch, and a chat with members of the Weldability-SIF family and staff. We would like to thank everyone there for making it an enjoyable and interesting day in Letchworth Garden City.

Report by Matthew Beard, Editorial Manager

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